The Star Gallery

This unique feature gives visitors the opportunity to learn about the stars and constellations that can be seen with the naked eye in the nighttime sky. The gallery stars range from the brightest star in the sky, Sirius, to some of the faintest visible from Atlanta. The represented gradations in brightness are as sensitive as can be discerned by the naked eye.

Each star was carefully plotted on the ceiling, forming an illuminated star chart. The fibers used to create the stars vary in diameter, allowing them to shine with 22 varying degrees of brightness. More than six miles of fiber optic wires accurately portray the 542 stars twinkling above.

SkyWatch screens provide daily programming about constellations, planets and astronomical events.

Star Gallery

Visitors can find the stars in The Star Gallery using the following guide:

  • Stand facing the doors to the IMAX┬« Theatre, which is toward the south, to recognize the constellations in the appropriate direction.
  • Antares in Scorpius and Arcturus in Bootes are located near The World of Shells exhibition.
  • By moving away from The World of Shells exhibition toward the Great Hall, which is eastward, visitors will pass under stars visible in the early evening in the spring, summer, autumn, winter and spring again.
  • Ursa Major (The Big Dipper) is easily recognized over the double doors to the Great Hall.
  • Andromeda is near the center of the room.
  • Orion nebula (M-42) is just below the belt stars of Orion.
  • Aldebaran (in the constellation Taurus) and Betelgeuse (in Orion) are found among the winter stars on the side near the Great Hall

Make star gazing part of your next special event.