Museum Musings

A Killer Treat


Next in our “Pick Your Poison(ous) Recipe” series, a treat that’s just for adults, submitted by registrar Wil Grewe-Mullins.Several _brownies

Killer Brownies

Ingredients: 

  • 1 box brownie mix; Ghirardelli Double Chocolate if possible
  • Maker’s Mark Bourbon

Instructions:
Make brownies according to directions on box, but replace water with Maker’s Mark Bourbon

Proviso:
Keep away from the children.

The end.

Join us Sunday, April 26 for the final Dangerously Delicious Tasting Event featuring treats from Blue Haven Bee Company, Judi Cakes, The Melting Pot and Whole Foods Market Briarcliff.

Doors open at 11:30am for members! Learn more. 

—Deanna Smith, Director of Marketing

Written by Fernbank Museum at 12:54

Earth Day Inspirations


Earth Day is just around the corner, offering another opportunity to teach visitors, young and old, why we love the earth, and why we should protect it. As a life science programs intern, I’ve grown slightly introspective as the date approaches. I care deeply about the planet and about the fate of its ecosystems, and Earth Day has always represented an opportunity to share that sentiment. Ashley Blog April 2015

Since I began interning at Fernbank in January, one of the main things that excites me is the Museum’s ability to draw out my own passions in the visitors. I’ve been interested in natural history since I was a small child; some of my earliest memories involve catching frogs and chasing snakes (and consequentlybeingchased when my parents realized what I was after). I grew up in the Washington D.C. area, and could be counted on to alternate between the zoo and the museum of natural history as my choices for weekend outings. Here, I love walking past the dinosaurs and through the front doors and experiencing the palpable excitement of the school groups who can’t wait to learn, even if they don’t quite know that’s what they are doing.

The message of conservation here is subtle; to me, the exhibits show what we have on earth is worth protecting, rather than simply preaching at an audience that surely has heard it all before. The exhibits excite a passion for knowledge which I developed in a similar setting. While I shadowed a live animal presentation, a little boy raised his hand and said “One day, I want to be a scientist!” I find it so heartening to know that visiting Fernbank might not be just a way to get out of class, but can truly be a formative experience for visitors.

The live animal presentations are particularly special for me; I’ve always loved reptiles and amphibians, but have always been surprised to find that not everyone shares that interest. At Fernbank, the visitors are at the edges of their seats trying to get a good look at the legless lizards or the blue tongued skink, and can hardly wait to guess why a lizard is not a snake. After the event, they race off to learn about the ecosystems of Georgia, to check out The Power of Poison exhibit and to appreciate the other animals and activities in Fernbank NatureQuest. As they do, I am confident that some of that love of the natural world will stick with them.

—Ashley Stumvoll, Life Sciences Intern

Written by Fernbank Museum at 11:17

Springtime Adventures

This year, we introduced a new format for our annual spring-themed event. Instead of a traditional egg hunt, visitors received eggs by participating in games and by following clues which lead them through Museum exhibitions.

Blog -family

The highlight of the event—baby animals from Sam’s Path Petting Zoo. We had ducklings, chicks, lambs and more.

Lamb -for -blog

My favorite was a 2-3 week old baby goat. During setup, I was able to bottle feed him!

Ds -pig

We hoped you enjoyed this new format! See the full set of photos here.

—Deanna Smith, Director of Marketing

Written by Fernbank Museum at 15:05

Dinosaur Q&A


While I’m a fan of the idea of Chris Pratt leading a gang of Velociraptors, nothing compares to the original Jurassic Park. And, nothing compares to watching this most iconic of dinosaur films with an actual paleontologist! 

Author and paleontologist Dr. Anthony Martin of Emory University will lead the special presentation Science on Screen: Jurassic Park at Fernbank Museum, Sunday, March 22.* Before Dr. Martin delves into the science behind the film (can we talk about thatTriceratops poop??), I had a few questions for him.Tony Martin Blog

What is your favorite part of being a paleontologist?
My favorite part of being a paleontologist is going outside and searching for fossils, especially with other paleontologists. I’m really happy whenever I get the chance to do this.

Why are my arms so short?
Blame your ancestors and evolution for that. Your great-great-great-great grandparents probably didn’t need big arms to survive a typical day during the Mesozoic Era, so your arms reflect that history, which is perfectly, normal. Besides, long arms are overrated.

What is your favorite dinosaur?
Oh, that’s easy: Oryctodromeus cubicularis. This was a small ornithopod dinosaur from Montana that lived during the Cretaceous Period, about 95 million years ago. One reason why it’s my favorite dinosaur is because it’s the only known burrowing dinosaur, fossilized in its den with two younger dinosaurs of the same species. Even better, I was lucky enough to co-name it! Its name literally means “digging runner of the den.”

Have you ever met Jeff Goldblum?
No, I haven’t. But you know what’s really sad for him? He hasn’t met me yet, either. Hopefully it will happen someday: after all, life finds a way.

Do you have any snacks?
What did you have in mind: Chihuahuas or Great Danes? Wait a minute: why are you looking at me like that?

Black and blue or gold and white?
I like dresses of all colors, regardless of how people perceive them.

Do you think feathers would look good on me?
Oh, for sure. I’m thinking iridescent black for most of your body, with some yellow and red feathers on your arms, and hot pink on the top of your head. With an ensemble like that, think of how you’d rock the Buckhead night life!

When can we go to Jurassic Park?
I’m sorry to report that ‘Jurassic Park’ closed about 145 million years ago. Fortunately, though, we can still see the living descendants of dinosaurs today as birds. Which is pretty cool, because that means you can watch the relatives of ‘Jurassic Park’ in your backyard every day.

You can find Dr. Martin on Twitter at @Ichnologist. And you can find me on Twitter at@giga_a_dino and on Facebook

—Giggy A. Dinosaur

*Admission to Science on Screen: Jurassic Park is free, but space is limited and. reservations are required. 

Written by Fernbank Museum at 11:45

A Sweet Treat “To Die For”


Continuing our series of “poisonous recipes” inspired by Fernbank’s
Dangerously Delicious Tasting Events, here’s a sweet treat from Laura Heiman, Grants and Sponsorship Coordinator. Laura graciously shared a batch of these with staff and I can attest to their deliciousness! 

Coookie Photo For Blog


Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies 

1 cup sugar
1 cup pumpkin
½ cup vegetable oil
1 egg
2 cups all-purpose flour
½ t. salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon milk
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 ½ cups chocolate chips
½ cup nuts (optional)



Directions:

  • Combine sugar, pumpkin, vegetable oil and egg.
  • In a separate bowl, add flour, salt, cinnamon and baking powder. Stir well.
  • Combine baking soda, milk and vanilla to dissolve and add to dry mixture.
  • Add dry mixture to wet mixture and mix well.
  • Add chocolate chips (and nuts, if desired).
  • Drop by spoonful on lightly greased baking sheet and back at 375 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
  • Enjoy!

Do you have a “poisonous recipe” you’d like to share? Send to social.media@fernbankmusuem.org.

—Deanna Smith, Director of Marketing

Written by Fernbank Museum at 16:28
Welcome to the official blog of Fernbank Museum of Natural History. This blog is an opportunity for the people that keep Fernbank running and constantly expanding, to share stories from their point of view. We hope you’ll enjoy these first-hand, behind-the-scenes glimpses of what goes into keeping a world-class natural history museum running. As always, we’d love to hear your feedback on these stories, to hear your personal experiences and hear any suggestions for topics. Happy reading!

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